It’s an outrage…

Has anyone else noticed how often that ‘outrage’ appears in newspaper and online news headlines these days?

I had to remind myself what it actually means, so often do I come across it:

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It’s the ‘anger’, ‘resentment’, ‘violates’, ‘brutality’ that bother me, when 99% of these stories demonstrate none of these things, merely lazy churnalism and efforts to create clickbait.

When was the last time you were really outraged by something?

Semantic bleaching again – overuse a word and it ceases to have any impact.

I’m not providing examples and driving traffic toward any of them – you know who they are. But imagine spending three years to get a degree in journalism and then being constantly driven (or subbed) to turn every story into an example of outrage?

It’s outrageous!

 

Thanks for the heads-up Yahoo!

Why is it that every time a major web-based service gets ‘hacked’, you only ever find out through the media?:¬†Yahoo hack: Should I panic?

As I use Flickr, I have a Yahoo login, but neither company has so much as sent an email to warn me that I might want to update my password as a precaution.

This is the third or fourth time that a similar situation has occurred, and each time it’s been through Reddit or the BBC’s online news that I’ve become aware of it.

Guess who’s not getting their service subscription renewed next year?

HyperNormalisation…

The writer and director of Bitter Lake has a new film that looks even more interesting and disturbing in equal measures:

“HyperNormalisation tells the extraordinary story of how we got to this strange time of great uncertainty and confusion – where those who are supposed to be in power are paralysed – and have no idea what to do. And, where events keep happening that seem inexplicable and out of control – from Donald Trump to Brexit, the War in Syria, the endless migrant crisis, and random bomb attacks. It explains not only why these chaotic events are happening – but also why we, and our politicians, cannot understand them.”